Environmental Science and Biocomplexity

Evironmental Science and Biocomplexity engages students in understanding the complex fabric of relationships between humans and the environment and the land- and resource-use challenges increasingly confronting society. It provides an excellent capstone experience for 11th and 12th grade students when used as an individual replacement module, a semester course, or a year-long intensive series of four curriculum units.

Biocomplexity is inquiry based.
The curriculum consists of authentic, inquiry-based field and lab investigations designed around cases in urban, agricultural, tropical, and polar systems. It builds on ecology, environmental science, human ecology, geography, economics, and anthropology.

Biocomplexity aligns with the Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards.
Because of its strong emphasis on science practices, disciplinary content, and cross-cutting concepts, the curriculum is very well aligned with the Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards. Students address environmental land-use challenges, choosing solutions and providing arguments and evidence to defend their choices. They model relationships among components in systems and use their models to make predictions.

Biocomplexity is meaningful to students’ lives.
Understanding the nature of the complex relationships between humans and the environment is vital and important for all citizens in an era of global human impact on the environment. This curriculum helps students acquire a biocomplex way of thinking; and with an increased knowledge of how Earth systems work, students can use biocomplexity science to make a positive difference in their environments.


Units

Urban Ecology Unit

Urban Ecology Unit

Sprawl Unit

Sprawl Unit

Amazonia Unit

Amazonia Unit

Arctic Unit

Arctic Unit


Authors

Gillian Puttick

Gillian Puttick

Brian Drayton

Brian Drayton

Jeff Lockwood

Jeff Lockwood

Marlene Cole

Marlene Cole

Meaghan Donovan

Meaghan Donovan

Alan Berkowitz

Alan Berkowitz